Investigation: Getting public records from Port St. Lucie can take citizens, media many months

When it comes to the ease of obtaining public records from the city of Port St. Lucie, the local government is more opaque than transparent, a Treasure Coast Newspapers investigation found. Oftentimes, seemingly routine record requests for a single animal-control report, a traffic study and information on city-employee retirement plans drag on for upwards of three months, the investigation found.

Investigation: Fired Port St. Lucie city attorney splurged on outside legal help

During her brief stint as city attorney, Pam Booker doled out exorbitant amounts of money on outside counsel, spending more than double what her predecessor did on contract legal firms, a  Treasure Coast Newspapers investigation into the city's Legal Department found. In her less than two years as city attorney, Booker authorized nearly $750,000 on outside legal counsel. Roger Orr — her predecessor and city attorney for 23 years — spent roughly $320,000  on similar services.

Investigation: Are officials inadvertently breaking records law online?

Government officials across Florida inadvertently could be breaking state public-records laws by simply using their social media accounts, a USA TODAY Network investigation found. Tweeting about government business and posting to Facebook or Instagram — using either official or personal accounts, regardless of having a disclaimer — without keeping a record of the postings violates Florida's open-records laws, legal experts say. So is deleting posts without archiving copies.